Python3 Programming Setup on Fedora 28

I have started to learn to program in python. Since I recently switched to various Linux distros for some of my play, I have been setting up the various distros so that I can program in python. This post discusses setting up python for programming on Fedora 28. Instructions for other Linux distros are somewhat different; I have already covered setting up python on Ubuntu 18.04 and openSUSE Tumbleweed an Fedora 28 in previous posts.

You may want to visit my Linux blog site, called Jim’s Adventures in Linux, to see some of the fun (I mean problems) I have been having with installing and using various Linux distros.

To learn to program in python, I have been reading a set of three books called Python: 3 Manuscripts in 1 book: – Python Programming For Beginners – Python Programming For Intermediates – Python Programming for Advanced. They are available both in paperback, and free in Kindle ebook format. Included in the first manuscript is instructions for installing Python on Windows, on Mac OS X, and on Ubuntu and Linux Mint. The instructions for Ubuntu and Linux Mint involve compiling from source; these are not needed. This post shows how to install Python3 directly from the Fedora 28 repositories. It includes instructions for installing the packages and python modules needed in the section Know how to start IDLE. No doubt other modules will be required.

Read more ›

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Posted in Languages, Linux

Python3 Programming Setup on openSUSE Tumbleweed

I have started to learn to program in python. Since I recently switched to various Linux distros for some of my play, I have been setting up the various distros so that I can program in python. This post discusses setting up python for programming on openSUSE Tumbleweed. These instructions should also be valid for openSUSE Leap 15, but I have not tried them.

To learn to program in python, I have been reading a set of three books called Python: 3 Manuscripts in 1 book: – Python Programming For Beginners – Python Programming For Intermediates – Python Programming for Advanced. They are available both in paperback, and free in Kindle ebook format. Included in the first manuscript is instructions for installing Python on Windows, on Mac OS X, and on Ubuntu and Linux Mint. The instructions for Ubuntu and Linux Mint involve compiling from source; these are not needed. This post shows how to install Python3 directly from the openSUSE repositories. It includes instructions for installing the packages and python modules needed in the section Know how to start IDLE. No doubt other modules will be required.

Read more ›

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Posted in Languages, Linux

Python3 Programming Setup on Ubuntu 18.04

I have started to learn to program in python. Since I recently switched to various Linux distros for some of my play, I have been setting up the various distros so that I can program in python. This post discusses setting up python for programming on Ubuntu 18.04. Instructions for non-Ubuntu distros are somewhat different; I will cover setting up python on openSUSE Tumbleweed an Fedora 28 in later posts.

In the meantime, you can visit my Linux blog site, called Jim’s Adventures in Linux, to see some of the fun (I mean problems) I have been having with installing and using various Linux distros.

To learn to program in python, I have been reading a set of three books called Python: 3 Manuscripts in 1 book: – Python Programming For Beginners – Python Programming For Intermediates – Python Programming for Advanced. They are available both in paperback, and free in Kindle ebook format. Included in the first manuscript is instructions for installing Python on Windows, on Mac OS X, and on Ubuntu and Linux Mint. The instructions for Ubuntu and Linux Mint involve compiling from source; these are not needed. This post shows how to install Python3 directly from the Ubuntu 18.04 repositories. It includes instructions for installing the packages and python modules needed in the section Know how to start IDLE. No doubt other modules will be required.

Read more ›

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Linux on a Stick

In a previous post, Mixing Linux and Windows, I discussed why I want to run both Windows and Linux GUI applications. I originally was going to create a full set of instructions here for installing a Linux distro on a USB flash drive. I recently started a Linux blog, so I published the instructions there as this is more properly a Linux topic than a Windows topic.

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yuk7’s and Microsoft’s WSL-DistroLauncher

When the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) beta was first released, the only choice was Ubuntu. With the release of Windows 10 Fall Creators Update in October 2017, WSL was formally released and Linux distros appeared in Windows Store. At that time, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, OpenSUSE Leap 42, and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 were made available, and there were promises made that Fedora would soon be available. Well, Fedora still hasn’t appeared, but Kali Linux and Debian GNU/Linux stretch have been added to the store.

Haruka.K. aka yuk7, created a tool called WSL-DistroLauncher, that allows users to create their own distros for side loading into WSL. Read more ›

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Posted in Development, Linux, Windows

Mixing Linux and Windows

I like Linux. I wish I could use Linux all the time. Unfortunately, I have a number of applications that only run on Windows so I can’t switch to Linux full time. These applications include Garmin Express for my GPS devices, Jaybird Run for my wireless earbuds, Zwift for indoor cycling on my smart trainer, and income tax software.

I also use Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop in my photography hobby. The problem with Lightroom and Photoshop is that they cost US $9.99 every month, and I am not currently doing a lot of photography. So I started looking for alternatives to those two applications, preferably free ones.

Requirements include the ability to apply tags to each photo and video, to perform quick adjustments of raw photos as well as jpg’s, and to perform extensive editing when necessary. This eliminates most free Windows software.

There are a number of Linux applications that would satisfy my needs. I have selected digikam for tagging and applying simple edits of both raw and jpg images, darktable for more extensive edits, and GIMP only when necessary. Each of these applications is available on Windows, but digikam will not directly open an image in another application on Windows. This is because digikam is built using the Qt libraries and those libraries do not support the required functionality on Windows.

So I have been looking for a way to run Linux applications on Windows. In the past, I have installed Linux on computers alone or as dual-boot with Windows, and have run Linux on a virtual machine on Windows. For various reasons, I have found none of these solutions completely workable.

Lately I have been experimenting with Windows Subsystem for Linux. WSL is showing some promise, but it does not work for me because digikam is Qt-based, and Qt-based applications do not currently work on WSL. There are a number of other problems with running GUI applications on WSL which I will probably discuss in a future post.

If I want to run Linux GUI applications, I will either have to use Linux in a virtual machine, which runs slowly, run Linux on a separate computer, or set up some sort of dual-boot arrangement. There are actually two ways to set up a dual boot computer:

  • Install Linux beside Windows and use GRUB to select the operating system to boot.
  • Install Linux on a USB disk drive or thumb drive (memory stick, flash drive) and select which drive to boot from the BIOS at computer startup.

I will discuss the second option in my next post, titled: Linux on a Stick. I prefer this option because it keeps the Linux and Windows systems completely separate.

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Posted in Linux, Windows

25 Beginner Programmer Mistakes

Samer Buna recently wrote an article on Medium where he listed 25 mistakes he made as a beginner programmer, and what you should do to correct them. I will not repeat the list here as you should read the original article. Even I learned a thing or two.

He included a number of quotes in the article. I will simply leave you with one of them:

Always code as if the guy who ends up maintaining your code will be a violent psychopath who knows where you live.

— John Woods

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Posted in Coding, Development, Documentation, Refactoring, Testing
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